Expanding Our Sexual Continuum

Throughout the past few weeks, like many of my fellow classmates on this blog, I have been challenged by the texts in our course to step back and think about how the words of early 20th century authors in our course reverberate in my day-to-day life. In Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, Nella Larsen’s…

The World as a Disease

What I’ve really come to take away from Quicksand, besides just how deeply our society has ingrained inescapable roles for people, is how infectious our society really is. Over the course of the story a lot of language is used to suggest that the structures we live within are like a disease. It’s a disease…

The Roaring Millennials?

Lately, it seems like the media has been caught up with the lives of millennials.  We’re starting our careers, getting ready to graduate from college or just starting our college careers, but journalists and researchers already have a lot to say about our lifestyles and futures. I was thinking about this as we read The…

Jewett’s Connection to Modern College Life

I would like to direct my post to the topic of what Professor Steele referred to as ‘the natural rhythm of life’ in The Country of the Pointed Firs by Sarah Orne Jewett, and look closer at the narrator’s natural rhythm while at Dunnet Landing. Professor Steele repeatedly described this theme in the novel, and…

The Afterlives of Winthrop’s “City on a Hill”

John Winthrop’s sermon, “A Model of Christian Charity” (1630), abounds with claims to moral authority. Perhaps that comes as no surprise given the conventional purposes of a sermon – to give moral instruction and spiritual encouragement within the bounds of a particular religious doctrine, and to remind the faithful of what could happen should they not…